Our Faith

OUR FAITH & WHAT WE BELIEVE





THE METHODIST CHURCH

The first Methodists were a group of friends who met in Oxford in the eighteenth century for prayer, Bible study and Holy Communion.  John Wesley was one of them and he started the movement that became known as the Methodist Church.  Methodists believed that religion should come from the heart and it had to make a difference to how you lived your life.

Today there are over 80 million Methodists all over the world with about 220,000 members and 5,000 churches in this country.


WHAT WE BELIEVE


Methodists are part of the world wide Church of Christ.  We believe that no one is beyond the reach of God's love.  God's love and forgiveness is not just for a chosen few but for everyone.

All Christians (including Methodists) believe that through Jesus' death on the cross and his resurrection, that God broke the power of all that is evil.

 

OUR MISSION STATEMENT

“Caring for all God's people through faith in Jesus Christ”

Approved at our General Church Meeting on 4 June 2015, we believe our calling is to respond  to the gospel of God's love in Christ, to live out our discipleship in worship and mission and to offer care and compassion to all God's people, locally and globally, through the power of God's Spirit.

Some of the ways this calling will be expressed are:

  • to develop ways of worshipping which enable people of all ages to experience the transforming presence of God;

  • to create opportunities to study and pray together so that our experience and understanding of God are deepened and the love of Jesus grows more in us;

  • to share our faith in Jesus Christ with confidence and sensitivity through all that we do and say;

  • to ensure that the pastoral care we offer is appropriate and helpful for each individual who needs it;

  • to offer hospitality and service to our local community through providing a welcoming environment and access to a wide variety of groups and activities; and

  • to raise awareness of and challenge issues of injustice and poverty.


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